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American Pioneer: Circa 1840-1880

'Laura Ingalls' Dress - $31.46

This lovely outfit includes a Dress, Apron and Bonnet. It features:

  • A dress made of a light green calico with a pink paisley design. The bodice gathers into a waistband and is trimmed with tiny white buttons
  • The sleeves are puffed and gather into tight cuffs. The cuffs and bodice neckline are also trimmed with white eyelet lace
  • An apron made of white fabric and trimmed with rows of pink ribbon and white eyelet lace
  • A bright pink calico bonnet with matching ties

This dress is shown with the 'Knickerbockers' Set, sold separately.

Quantities are limited. There are only 4 available.

Who is Laura Ingalls?

Laura Ingalls Wilder and her family are the most famous ‘Pioneers’. Their story was made popular through a series of books written in the 1930’s by Laura. The ‘Little House’ books put the Ingalls family story into a novel form. The original series chronicle the happenings from when Laura was very young, up until she married Almanzo Wilder in 1885.

Laura only had one surviving child, Rose Wilder Lane, who was also a celebrated authoress. Laura had not thought of writing until her mother, Caroline Ingalls, and sister Mary died. Her desire to preserve their legacy, combined with financial hardship due to the Great Depression, prompted her to write what is now known as the ‘Little House’ books.

What is an ‘Apron’?

An apron is a piece of fabric used to keep clothing clean while working. Aprons have been used for many hundreds of years, and their exact origin is unknown. During the Colonial and Victorian times, aprons were worn by upper-class as well as working lower-class women. For the upper-class woman, an apron was a symbol of domesticity and womanhood. These aprons were not used to protect clothing from dirt, but instead the aprons were often heavily embroidered and decorated.

What is a ‘Bonnet’?

A ‘bonnet’ is a type of hat that was worn by women from the 17th to the 20th centuries. A lady’s bonnet would often be lavishly decorated, but a pioneer woman’s bonnet would have been more practical. A lady on the frontier would have used her bonnet to protect her face and neck from the harsh sun while working outdoors. A middle-class woman would have had 2 bonnets, one made of lighter fabric or straw and the other from a heavier wool. A middle-class lady would have switched from her winter bonnet to her summer bonnet on Easter Sunday, starting the tradition of the ‘Easter Bonnet’.

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